Elise Sabran

Global Finance Syndicate Chief Operating Officer in the Global Banking and Investor Solutions division

X

Elise Sabran is Global Finance Syndicate Chief Operating Officer in the Global Banking and Investor Solutions division at Societe Generale (SG). Working globally, with a base in London, she has been in the role for the last five years, having worked for SG in London for 15 years and in Paris for two years prior. Her studies in Lyon, France led her to a career in Finance and Banking.

Tell us a little bit about a day in the life of a Global Finance Syndicate Chief Operating Officer at Societe Generale.

In the role of a Chief Operating Officer (COO) you have a whole suite of recurrent tasks which are required to keep things moving, and of course you are also on hand to deal with queries from my direct manager who is the Global Head of the Global Finance business line. I’m also working with a team of over 100 people, so there is huge variety in what I’ll do day-to-day. I’ve become very good at juggling, prioritising and knowing how to work with both planned and unexpected workload.
An average day might be starting at 8.30am and finishing around 5.30 or 6pm. I’m a mum of two so I ensure my professional life works around childcare arrangements. I don’t stay too late but as a consequence I work non-stop days, which suits me. However, that means I am very strict about leaving on time to get back to my family.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

I knew from an early age I would work in banking - I liked economics, and in Lyon where I lived at the time, there was a good school for banking and finance. If you’d have asked me at 18 if I had a career plan I would have told you I didn’t - but my first role was working in a local bank and I’ve never looked back. I’ve relocated with SG from Paris to London which has been a great move. I knew I wanted to come to London - and then I started in one of the SG teams, I was lucky to join a really good team. Since then I have moved more laterally which has presented even more opportunities. So, it wasn’t career planning as such, it was meeting the right people at the right time and going for it.

What do you enjoy most about working at SG?

There are two main things I want to raise here - I’m really lucky to have always worked with extremely good managers and they have been respectful that I have to balance professional and personal life. They put a lot of trust in me to deliver - it’s certainly been a pleasure to work for all the people I have reported to.
Second, there is very good team spirit in SG London. I really like working in the London team. My experiences are mainly in my specific team - we are a bunch of around 45 people. It’s a group who treat each other fairly and with a lot of respect. I have made very good friends here and look forward to going to work - you know you’ll be seeing great colleagues. There have been a couple of times in my career where I have had the option to stop working, and the people at SG were one of the reasons I wanted to continue working.

What advice would you give someone who wishes to move in to a leadership position for the first time?

You have to believe what you are capable of doing - if that’s the case you can find the opportunity you want yourself if you’re determined enough.. If you want something, then say it! Probably say it several times! And then be patient as well… I think what experience has taught me that you can’t have everything that you want in the next 2-3 years, sometimes you have to be patient as well as being determined.

What advice can you give to someone about raising their profile within their own organisations?

I’m not sure I would give advice because I am still learning myself after all these years! I started from scratch like most women, because we know we are not the best at raising our own profiles. I actually think that is true about women! I would love to say - try to work your network and speak out loud . Be confident!

Have you benefited from coaching or mentoring at SG?

Yes, about 3 years ago as part of the UK Women’s Network of SG London I was part of a group coaching programme where 10 directors took part. With a facilitator we used discussion sessions to gather 360 degree feedback which was really useful as I had not done that exercise before.
I was also involved in a mentoring programme - originally I was a mentee and then I went on also to become a mentor. I was fortunate to be mentored by a senior director within the bank who gave me some great advice on how to manage new challenges and pressures at a really key point in my career. When I was a mentor I offered advice and guidance to someone working in a completely different department to mine. I was able to help guide her through preparing to change position, and think through how to prepare objectives and gain confidence. We are still in touch and see other twice a year. It was really beneficial for both of us and a really interesting experience.

And how about networking?

To be honest, I don’t network externally - it’s down to a total lack of time! That said, I’m still part of the UK Women’s Network, am organising training and am trying to put into place a coaching programme for new joiners similar to the one I benefitted from.

What does the future hold for you?

For once, I am trying to have a plan! I am learning from past experience. I’ll plan ahead now to learn new skills which will ensure I am ready to move to the next position that I identify as my goal. For the first time ever I am planning several years ahead!

Marie Bernon

Head of the French Team at Societe Generale Private Banking

X

Marie Bernon is Head of the French Team at Societe Generale Private Banking Hambros (SGPB Hambros)), the private banking arm of Societe Generale. Having been with Societe Generale (SG) since 2000, she has worked across France, Belgium and most recently in the UK.

Marie, how did you get into the world of private banking?

I studied Finance in France and my first job in SG was in international audit. I went into this division because I wanted to move into banking but I was not entirely sure which area. After this foundation, I was able to move into the private bank as I did an assignment in private banking in Switzerland.. I’ve moved locations several times, and been lucky enough to continue working with SG by deploying my own networks to identify opportunities.

Tell us a little bit about a day in the life at SGPB Hambros.

Generally, the workday starts at around 9am. Typically I’ll spend about a third of my time interacting with clients, a third with SGPB Hambros teams or other specialist experts in the bank and then the remaining time ensuring my admin is up to date in relation to the management of the team I manage. It’s very diverse as I’m facing off to different parts of the organisation.
It’s a demanding job dealing with private clients, but since you’re dealing with matters close to their heart you can be assured that they will be satisfied with your efforts. Whilst it can be hard to find a balance on the number of hours you work, I have a very understanding bunch of people inside and outside the office who make it happen! It’s a team effort in the true sense. For me, my time at home is also about quality. I was a bit circumspect about the notion of quality time, but I think it’s quite right. When you are at home you are 100% there, and properly available for your family - my role at SGPB Hambros allows me to do that.

What do you enjoy most about working at SGPB Hambros?

In my current position I have both a management position and also a front office / operational position - I like the fact I can be a full time private banker with my clients but also manage people and get involved in coaching and training members of my team. It’s not always easy to have two hats but I really like having that balance. As a junior, I learnt a lot just seeing my manager work and learning from how they faced challenges, so I think if you set a good example and your team see how you do business they can learn a great deal from it.

We are brought together well as team at SGPB Hambros - it’s a great company to work for as a woman - you feel cared for, not just a number. As an organisation it has a sense of responsibility for its staff which I like. It feels a bit more human than some other organisations.

What advice would you give someone who wishes to move in to a leadership / management position?

As a female in the city - and this is true for some but of course not all women - they are often not open to raising their own profile and it’s something you should do if you want to progress.. If you are too quiet sometimes people can assume you are not interested in progressing.

If you want to move into a role managing a team, I think it is important to acknowledge that not everything is in your control when you have a team. It is very important to set out what the rules are and what is not negotiable whilst also accepting that they will do some things their way - and that there are other ways of doing things that aren’t your way but are still good.

Have you benefited from coaching or mentoring?

I have had some informal coaching in relation to behaviours and how that relates to the best way to do the job. In an organisation like SGPB Hambros you cross paths with lots of people from whom you can learn a lot - in the way they behave, the way they raise their profiles, and in the way that they technically operate in their roles. We have a large number of people who are inspiring and I’m lucky enough to have worked with a lot of them. One piece of advice I have is that sometimes you have to ask for coaching rather than wait for it to come to you.

What kind of networking do you do?

Networking is something that with my team we are working on a lot. I’ve been invited to be part of the SG Women’s Network and have agreed with other team members to go along to some of the events. There are some really good speakers. Personally, I don’t do a great deal of networking to raise my own profile at the moment. It’s a habit that you need to get into - my impression is that English people tend to network more than the French do!

What does the future hold for you?

I really enjoy being in a management role - in the future I would like to have more of a holistic view of the organisation and be more involved in strategic thinking. Private banking is often focused on the day-to-day successes so in the future I’d like to take a different approach and have a bigger picture of the organisation.

Nathalie Revillion-Castro

Director, Clearing Services EMEA in the Listed Derivatives Operations part of Newedge

X

Nathalie Revillion-Castro is Director, Clearing Services EMEA in the Listed Derivatives Operationspart of Newedge, part of the Societe Generale Group. She has been at the organisation for 13 years and has worked both in middle office and back office roles before her current position.

How did you get into the industry, Nathalie?

I hold a Masters in Finance and Economics and I did an internship at Societe Generale. In 2001, I applied for a permanent role in Paris as a broker. I moved to work for the company in London in 2004. Now, I head up the Clearing Services team who are based in Paris, Dubai and the UK. There are about 40 of us in our team in total.
I knew that I wanted to work in a middle office financial services role - I was attracted by the excitement of the markets, and the fact that every day is different. I like the pressure!

Tell us a little bit about a day in the life of in your role at Newedge.

I’m a busy mum, I have 3 children so I don’t start before 10am but I tend to stay later. A typical day means that when I arrive I make sure all the shifts are covered across the exchanges. We have a shift rota to cover on a weekly basis so that’s really important. I’ll check my agenda for any key meetings and look at what ‘business as usual’ activity we have alongside specific project deadlines. I’d like to say it’s similar each day but to be honest everything can change within an hour when you are working with the markets! The day normally finishes around 7pm but it does depend on what has happened in the markets that day. I like the fact it’s different each day - it keeps me interested.

The bank is good at offering flexibility so that I can work from home occasionally if needed and I don’t feel micro-managed - it’s more output based rather than monitoring exactly the number of hours I spend in the office.

What do you enjoy most about working here?

The team has changed quite a bit since I joined, originally it was a small company and everyone knew each other - now it’s much bigger but the nice thing is that people still recognise the contribution that you make. That’s why I am still here.

There is a real family spirit in the team here. Everyone knows each other and what they deliver and I get the sense that it is a true meritocracy. You can feel it when you are in the office - you can as easily meet up with the top managers as you can with your peers.

I’d also point out the flexible management style and work life balance that I have been able to achieve here.

What advice would you give someone who wishes to move in to a leadership / management role?

To be strong, firm but fair. Don’t try and please everyone, because you can’t. Establish boundaries between your colleagues and your friends even if you have worked together for a long time. I think it is important to have that fine line. If you are a team manager, empower your team members rather than trying to do everything yourself. If you invest time in them, they can progress with your as you advance in your career.

If I’m advising someone on how to raise their own profile, I would say be visible - make sure that people know who you are. And most importantly, when you say that you will deliver, make sure that you do. Be honest, and say if you don’t know - it is good to ask questions!

Have you benefited from coaching or mentoring?

I have received some formal coaching which took place across 3 months. Regular meetings with my manager and coach allowed me to monitor progress and learning. It was useful because you have the chance to learn about yourself and how others see you. It also helped me to organise my own time better and consider how best to deal with conflict. I’ve also been able to coach others, in the sense that I’m able to be a role model for others and offer informal advice.

What does the future hold for you?

I feel that it is up to me to influence my own career. I’m not waiting for the company to bring me new opportunities. I like to try and keep in control of that and look out for what opportunities will be on the horizon next. I think it is important to embrace chance and see how it can bring opportunity in the form of new projects, new challenges, new roles.

Rebecca Constable

Director at Societe Generale Private Banking Hambros (SGPB Hambros)

X

Rebecca Constable is a Director at Societe Generale Private Banking Hambros (SGPB Hambros), the private banking arm of Societe Generale. Her career has spanned 27 years in the industry across several key players. She has worked in the City and is now based in the Thames Valley operating a regional office for SG Hambros.

Rebecca, tell me a bit about your background and your career path.

I joined Hambros just over five years ago having been working in the City for over 25 years. After university I joined an investment banking graduate programme and then went into fund management before making the move to private banking. After a sabbatical about 5 years ago, I decided to move from the City to a more regional role and am now with SG Hambros having helped to open our regional office in Newbury.

What made you want to join SG Hambros?

Having been working for a large retail bank but on the private banking side, I understood how the two could complement each other. When I was offered the opportunity to come to SG Hambros, I was able to combine working for a smaller, more niche bank, with working in an organisation that a wealth of resource and expertise. Hambros also has a really good name in the banking industry. From what I have seen there is quite a lot of mobility which is great - you can move from one side of the organisation to another or across location too. There is an opportunity to develop linguistic skills too.

What do you enjoy most about working here?

I like the combination of looking after clients and ensuring that we actually do the right thing for them - which is the focus of what we do - whilst also working closely with all my colleagues in the different areas. My role is about bringing in the right expertise from across the organisation to make sure what my clients need actually happens. I am also increasingly enjoying running the team, developing it and bringing in new talent.

Do you network internally or externally?

Because I work out of a regional office, it is very important that people know who I am, and that we as an office have a profile. Our colleagues are in London, Paris and the Channel Islands so we spend a lot of time on internal networking, getting to know all our colleagues.

Personally, I am also involved in several women’s networking groups. I was a founder member of The Adelaide Group (Berwin Leighton Paisner) who meet 6 times a year with guest speakers and host lunches for senior female leaders in the City. Through that network I have met some fascinating people. I am also a member of the Institute of Directors (IoD) and am a CISI fellow (Chartered Institute of Securities and Investment). I try and attend some of the City based networking events. I a also involved in the charitable sector as a trustee of a charity that supports education. Amongst other things, all these networks are a great opportunity to meet people and I think it makes me better at my job.

On a typical workday, how do you start your day and how does it end?

I am an early riser which is a legacy from my commuting days. Now that I work locally, I am able to get into the office fairly easily so I arrive into the office about 7.45 - 8am. I enjoy that first hour of the day before 9am to allow me to focus my mind on the day ahead and prioritise. At the beginning of each week my team sit down together and talk about the week ahead.

Ideally I like to have a couple of client meetings in the diary every day - client meetings are a core activity. My day is spent in meeting or in dialogue on the telephone with clients / intermediaries. I also spend time using social networking as part of new business development and to make contact with people I have met at events. I have client lunches and evening events most weeks. The day will finish somewhere between 6.30 and 9pm depending on what is going on. One night a week I’ll just stay a bit later in the office to catch up on things. It is very varied - and that is one of the things I love about my job. I don’t have to do a huge amount of travelling because my clients are local or in London. I have three older children, and a husband who also has a high pressured job, so striking the balance is possible for me. We have had to reappraise things along the way, but we are fortunate that we have made it work.

What advice would you give someone who wishes to move in to a leadership / management position?

Have a positive outlook and show cooperation. I believe you need to channel your energies into things that you really believe in. The really successful managers/leaders I know really believe in what they do. If they are only a manager to go up the career ladder then they won’t succeed. If you believe in what you do, then you are more likely to be able to have fun!. And, I believe you are more likely to act with integrity.

To raise your profile, take that time to focus on areas that you believe in, spend a bit of time thinking about yourself as an individual and what you think you enjoy and are good at. If you can ensure that you have some real differentiators in that area then you will do well.

How have you benefited from coaching or mentoring?

Through working with colleagues and on the job mentoring. The best mentoring I have had is working with people on senior management and discussing issues or problems with them, or relaying client circumstances and gaining their perspectives. In a people focused world, and working in a regional office, that is a really important part of my job. At SG Hambros we do get access to senior management which is great.

How would you describe the culture at SG Hambros?

It combines an entrepreneurial atmosphere and working environment with the heritage of the Hambros name and the breadth of the SG network within Europe. It is quite small, with a flat structure and not too hierarchical. People aren’t intimidated to talk to senior management which I like.

It is a very open and positive working environment where decisions are made relatively quickly - and that is partly because it is an open environment. There is a good team spirit and it is encouraged that we work as a team and across teams. The bank is open to ideas and ways of developing the business. It is acknowledged that it is important to develop talent and to bring in a range of different individuals. I don’t think I’ve worked in an organisation before where I’ve had so many different colleagues from a range of backgrounds and with varied skills sets. We all benefit from working with each other.

Su Dobney

GMI Regional Manager for Western Europe at Societe Generale

X

Su Dobney is GMI Regional Manager for Western Europe at Societe Generale and has been part of the Group for 20 years. Her career has spanned several departments leading her to a pivotal role in the organisation.

Su, tell us a bit about your career within Societe Generale…

I joined Societe Generale Private Banking Hambros (SGPB Hambros) which was bought by Societe Generale (SG) in [XXXX]. In my early career I worked in current account banking making payments and later transferred to working in IT. When SG took over SGPB Hambros I held several roles within the call centre part of the business and the e-mail team. My role has really evolved over time - I am now a liaison between Paris and London focusing on Mail and Messaging and key to my role is relationships. I’m not managing people or infrastructure, I’m managing important stakeholder relationships.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

It has been very organic - the only time I really had any sort of plan was when I opted to move out of banking and into IT. I worked for another bank previously and originally thought on leaving that I would change sectors, but when a role came up at SGPB Hambros I decided to stay in banking, but doing something different. When SG bought SGPB Hambros I saw the opportunity advertised internally and applied. That’s an illustration of how my career has grown - opportunities arise along the way and you have the option to go for them. In an organisation like SGPB Hambros, there are lots of options to move about and change what you are working on. In the IT side of banking, things are changing all the time!

On a typical workday, how do you start your day and how does it end?

Generally speaking I arrive at the office around 9am - my day largely consists of meetings. I’m involved in a lot of global projects, so I’ll be catching up on progress and managing the coordination of new projects. I’ll have a lot of email traffic too - I communicate with people from all the different project teams across the business and receive lots of requests from the user support team in the UK and Western Europe about resolving issues and improving processes. The end of the day is usually a bit more peaceful and that’s when have some solid ‘work time’. I finish anytime between 6.30 and 8pm depending on the day’s activity. I always make sure I leave at a reasonable time when I have social activities lined up and save other days for catching up.

What advice would you give someone who wishes to move in to a leadership / management position?

I think it is worthwhile considering managerial skills training. Some of my colleagues have had training recently in understanding how different people work and how to get the best out of people, by understanding what motivates them. It is also key to understand that it is OK for your team to be different to you! There is definitely a transition phase between being an operational leader and the move into people management.

What advice can you give to our members about raising their profiles within their own organisations?

Be the best you can - and in a fair organisation you should be recognised for that. I’ve got to where I am because I have always been open to helping colleagues and have been known to be someone who will get things done when I say I will. I would recommend being collaborative - working well with others, and being known to be trustworthy and reliable. Make yourself useful to people, and they are then more likely to do the same for you.

When it comes to networking I don’t do much externally but I do network with SG. For example, I belong to the SG singers, our company choir. We perform twice a year and it’s a really nice way to be connected to the business

How have you benefited from coaching or mentoring?

My direct manager is a great coach - he has been very good at providing support on how I should approach various challenges whilst also empowering me. He himself also has a good profile and relationships across the business.

Search information

Use the plus sign (+) to search for two key words.

Use "AND-NOT" to get results excluding the keyword following "AND-NOT".
Eg: France AND-NOT Sogessur for results about France excluding Sogessur.

Connection required

Please sign in to your candidate profile or create one to complete this task.

  • Please check the information you provided.
Register Forgot password?
Search error

The key word must be at least 2 characters long and cannot contain an asterisk.

Maximum number of documents authorised

You can only store 5 CV or 5 other documents in your profile. To upload a new file please remove one of the exiting documents.

Print

Please select at least one job offer.

Connection required

Please sign in to your candidate profile or create one to complete this task.

  • Please check the information you provided.
Register Forgot password?
Connection required

Please sign in to your candidate profile or create one to complete this task.

  • Please check the information you provided.
Register Forgot password?
Connection required

Please sign in to your candidate profile or create one to complete this task.

  • Please check the information you provided.
Register Forgot password?
Connection required

Please sign in to your candidate profile or create one to complete this task.

  • Please check the information you provided.
Register Forgot password?
Connection required

Please sign in to your candidate profile or create one to complete this task.

  • Please check the information you provided.
Register Forgot password?